Selecting Neutral in Gransport to save clutch when stopped in traffic?

mjheathcote

Centenary Club
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7,965
I went on a police driving course a few years ago and they said a few interesting things that aren’t what you’re taught. One was to always sit with your foot on the brake. Because if you only have the handbrake on and get hit from behind it lifts the rear wheels off the ground and you hit the car in front.
It's what I do, and it did save my front end being burried into the car in front when I was rear ended at traffic lights.
 

D Walker

Centenary Club
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9,353
It's what I do, and it did save my front end being burried into the car in front when I was rear ended at traffic lights.
A mate of mine went into the back of someone at some lights....however the car behind him also went into him....
I bet everyone on here can guess what he told his insurance.......
 
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167
The whole point of setting the Point of Initial Slip (PIS) on the F1 clutch is to ensure there is no clutch engagement when idling. As RPMs rise, the F1 engages the clutch. So shifting to neutral at lights or in traffic yields no gain. It does, however, delay any response you have that involves the need to accelerate out of the way, so I keep it in gear.



——-\|/——-
2004 CC “Siluro” the Italian Torpedo
2011 Audi A4 “mafia mobile”
 

CatmanV2

Member
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39,286
Well from memory keeping in gear engages the release bearing, whereas in neutral the clutch plates are engaged.

And I suspect you can get an F1 box in gear in the amount of time it takes to move your foot from brake to throttle ;)

Leave it in gear long enough and it will shift into neutral automatically (which is embarrassing when you go to pull away and hadn't noticed) ;)

In any event I think it's a bit either / or. No real difference either way

C
 

mjheathcote

Centenary Club
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7,965
Well from memory keeping in gear engages the release bearing, whereas in neutral the clutch plates are engaged.

And I suspect you can get an F1 box in gear in the amount of time it takes to move your foot from brake to throttle ;)

Leave it in gear long enough and it will shift into neutral automatically (which is embarrassing when you go to pull away and hadn't noticed) ;)

In any event I think it's a bit either / or. No real difference either way

C
I'm not sure that is actually the case, I believed that the clutch is disengaged what ever the gear, including neutral, when the engine is running.
So if you are say in first, and turn off the ignition, the clutch engages so you are in gear when parked. Then when you start, and before the starter engages, the clutch disengages and neutral is selected. I don't think the clutch will then engage again once neutral is selected.
 

Zep

Moderator
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5,898
I'm not sure that is actually the case, I believed that the clutch is disengaged what ever the gear, including neutral, when the engine is running.
So if you are say in first, and turn off the ignition, the clutch engages so you are in gear when parked. Then when you start, and before the starter engages, the clutch disengages and neutral is selected. I don't think the clutch will then engage again once neutral is selected.
It engages after 30 seconds idling without moving. There is a distinct change in note and a little bit of a rattle from the torque tube as it starts to spin.
 

Zep

Moderator
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5,898
I do this when I remember, because the system holds the clutch as close to the PIS as it can to give quick engagement of the clutch and there can be (in my view) a very small amount of drag which means wear. But then, if the clutch is always open, what difference does it make, right?

If the gearbox is in neutral and there is a little bit of drag, it only needs to spin the input shaft, and won’t be moving against the the driver holding the car on the brakes, so any potential wear is negated.

This is my “logic” anyway.
 

safrane

Member
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14,538
Used to do this on my first 4200, but not on the latter two. My wear is c1 or 2% per 1k miles... so I can't see the point of changing to N as this would just wear out other components more rapidly.
 

Gp79

Member
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1,171
Used to do this on my first 4200, but not on the latter two. My wear is c1 or 2% per 1k miles... so I can't see the point of changing to N as this would just wear out other components more rapidly.
100%
the clutch wear is the least of my worries on my GS, the clutch tangs will probably fail before the friction discs are worn out anyway
Just drive it (with a properly set up clutch)
 

2b1ask1

Centenary Club
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17,705
Well my old 4200 had been subject to a clutch change under warranty (allegedly) at 13,000 miles. in my time I took it from 42,000 to 74,000 on the same clutch. It was slipping by the end and when it was auctioned the new owners had it replaced as it was done for by the thieves.

GS is on the original clutch but that is no surprise, it is only on 28,000 miles. I'll drive it as I see fit till it goes if I have it that long, maybe 10 years away?
 

StuartW

Centenary Club
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8,843
I do this when I remember, because the system holds the clutch as close to the PIS as it can to give quick engagement of the clutch and there can be (in my view) a very small amount of drag which means wear. But then, if the clutch is always open, what difference does it make, right?

If the gearbox is in neutral and there is a little bit of drag, it only needs to spin the input shaft, and won’t be moving against the the driver holding the car on the brakes, so any potential wear is negated.

This is my “logic” anyway.

Agreed - I do this too.

My clutch wear after 8,000 miles is showing at 9% worn and that includes a few hard track sessions. My clutch was fitted & set up by the master tech at Maserati GB so I guess they got it just right. plus maybe I am a super smooth driver?!
 

greenelekta

Junior Member
Messages
11
Thanks for the replies. It seems like there is no definitive answer. I think I will go into neutral if stationary for sometime otherwise not.
 

MattWill

New Member
Messages
19
I believe the clutch is not engaged when stationary with your foot in the break. The wear is when you start off because the clutch slips up to around 1500rpm. So when in traffic, let a gap open and boot it so you are past the slip point as quickly as possible.
I asked Nareman at Nuvola this question and he said exactly this: keep it in gear but keep your foot on the brake for a short stop. This way the clutch plates can’t rotate and so no wear. But he said putting in neutral also works but is not necessary.
 

Zep

Moderator
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5,898
I asked Nareman at Nuvola this question and he said exactly this: keep it in gear but keep your foot on the brake for a short stop. This way the clutch plates can’t rotate and so no wear. But he said putting in neutral also works but is not necessary.
I’m sorry to Nareman, but that doesn’t really make sense.

Wear occurs when one part of the clutch moves and the other is stationary and there is drag between them. This is the exact circumstances created by being in gear and having your foot on the brakes, as the clutch pressure plate is bolted to the engine is still spinning and the plates are held firmly by the brakes.

Putting it in neutral means both parts can spin if there is any drag, notably different.

Whether there is any drag is the question on the benefit of putting it in neutral.
 

spn

Junior Member
Messages
85
I’m sorry to Nareman, but that doesn’t really make sense.

Wear occurs when one part of the clutch moves and the other is stationary and there is drag between them. This is the exact circumstances created by being in gear and having your foot on the brakes, as the clutch pressure plate is bolted to the engine is still spinning and the plates are held firmly by the brakes.

Putting it in neutral means both parts can spin if there is any drag, notably different.

Whether there is any drag is the question on the benefit of putting it in neutral.
When you put your foot on the brake pedal, it opens the clutch so unless it's dragging, no wear.
 

Zep

Moderator
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5,898
When you put your foot on the brake pedal, it opens the clutch so unless it's dragging, no wear.
Exactly, unless it’s dragging.

It opens to the PIS, where there can still be some drag, is my understanding.

I have seen CC gearbox cars on ramps at idle with the rear wheels turning very slowly. This is why I drop into neutral.

But everyone pays their money and makes their choice.
 

Oneball

Member
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6,367
Exactly, unless it’s dragging.

It opens to the PIS, where there can still be some drag, is my understanding.

I have seen CC gearbox cars on ramps at idle with the rear wheels turning very slowly. This is why I drop into neutral.

But everyone pays their money and makes their choice.
Agree with you about the clutch drag. But the rotation of the rear wheels happens when the clutch is engaged and the car is in neutral because friction within the box it turning the main shaft.
 

Wanderer

Member
Messages
5,576
Exactly, unless it’s dragging.

It opens to the PIS, where there can still be some drag, is my understanding.

I have seen CC gearbox cars on ramps at idle with the rear wheels turning very slowly. This is why I drop into neutral.

But everyone pays their money and makes their choice.
Marios set mine up - I trust him.