Teachers looking after their own.

DavidL

Junior Member
Messages
159
Sorry don't think it is.
Non are single parent families.
All have partners either not working or normally working from home, so childcare isn't a problem.
And all that are 'keyworkers' are part time teaching assistants, who, for the last couple of months have not even been working, on full pay! But now qualify for their kids to have a full education to the end of the school year, the remaining excluded.
There is no reason why they can't educate the whole year group split into two groups, in two separate sessions, as all have at least one parent either not working or working at home to look after the time when they aren't at school.
To make it worse, the school hit the send button on the email just as they ran out of the door for half term so they wouldn't receive any reply emails or telephone calls.
But why are teachers irking you so? Lots of people qualify as "keyworkers" who arguably aren't critical but HMG made those rules. Some families gain more assistance from this than others and some take advantage of it but only if they are allowed to. I agree they shouldn't but that's a whole different discussion.
HMG also made the rules about only needing one "keyworker" per family to qualify.
To be fair you can't say there aren't any single parents who are teachers, there are, and we can't say all have a parent at home in some capacity as again this is far too broad a brush.
All schools will still be offering keyworker cover over half term as they did at Easter and in fact its rare that a school is empty on any given day throughout any holiday but again a different discussion. Our school certainly have contact and cover over the holiday especially now.
If the thread was entitled something like "keyworkers taking the p**s" then I'd agree but just aiming at schools is unfair.
 
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mjheathcote

Centenary Club
Messages
7,113
I'm stating the situation at our particular J&I School, in which case 'the rules' are completely biased to enable teachers to look after there own to the exclusion of others.
It might not be the same (and I'm sure it isn't) the case everywhere, but is in this particular case.
If the school was completely closed, this wouldn't effect any of the keyworker families one little bit, in this case, to be able to do their job.
If you like, 'the rules' have allowed a golden ticket to allow an education to some, at the exclusion of others, within the same year group which are at a critical stage.
You simply can't educate (not simply childcare) half a year group to the exclusion of the others!
 

safrane

Member
Messages
12,752
I guess you could look at all this Covid stuff and see some who we perceive are benefiting and some who are loosing out.

There are those who have been paid to be at home whilst others who are sent to the front line with inadequate protection.

Those who believed lock down was for others and not them.

Those who have profited and those who have lost out.

Some who have died whilst other survive.

Like life, there are winners and loosers at every corner and the more you let it rile you the worse you will feel.

For those who are blessed with children and are spending more time with them... in time you will look back and wish you had the opportunity to do it more often.
 

dickygrace

www.richardgracecars.co.uk
Messages
5,336
The tricky thing is that schools can’t do what they want. The govt have given them an ever changing list of boxes to tick and measures to bring in. I’ve discussed this at length with 2 head teachers of primary schools and 2 head governors.

It’s so simple:

No new rules
No social distancing
No religious assemblies (might stick)
Go back if you want (Y1,2,6)
Don’t send your kids if you don’t want to (as you believe all you see on TV) or they are at risk or a person in their home is at risk.
Teachers who are at risk are exempt from going to school and can sit at home and do all the paperwork they need to catch up on (and the school’s never ending list of BS paperwork) and I think there’d be very few teachers not clambering at the gates to go back.


I was a deputy head of a primary school so have plenty of experience and my two best mates are both headmasters (a word which is no longer PC but I don’t see why not so I use it intentionally as often as possible).
 
Messages
5,376
If teachers had been more proactive throughout this then they would have been in a more ready state than they appear to be now. Constantly I read and hear about how tough it is to manage.
Well it is not imho and I have direct relevant experience from days gone by.
I suppose I am teacher bashing but they deserve it right now
No offence intended to anyone on here, it is just my take on things
 

dickygrace

www.richardgracecars.co.uk
Messages
5,336
If teachers had been more proactive throughout this then they would have been in a more ready state than they appear to be now. Constantly I read and hear about how tough it is to manage.
Well it is not imho and I have direct relevant experience from days gone by.
I suppose I am teacher bashing but they deserve it right now
No offence intended to anyone on here, it is just my take on things
It’s not the teachers, it’s unrealistic government recommendations around the logistics when they go back. Teachers have been teaching key worker’s kids throughout.
 

midlifecrisis

Moderator
Messages
8,353
Have teachers ever heard of As Low As Reasonably Practicable?
It is enshrined in HASAWA 1974
And various Aviation Publications and we're pretty safe. The issue is that no-one has prepared for the return to work. Taken stock of what measures need to be put in place (if any) and then communicated the plan in a clear and consistent manner. instead we get half-baked ideas communicated by social media which only exacerbates the the situation and parents and teachers lose faith in returning to work.
 

Scaf

Member
Messages
1,952
Whatever you point of view on this, your criticism should not be aimed at “teachers” it should be aimed at the school management / heads / deity heads etc.
One of my daughters is a teacher and has absolutely no input on how the school manage this crisis, infact right now she doesn’t even know is she has to go into the school next week or work from home, she is still waiting for that email.
Much in the same way she has no input in the Union discussion as they have not been asked, the union leaders are out there making a noise but have yet to ask the teachers what they think.
My daughters union official is not very contactable because they are working from home !!
 

lozcb

Member
Messages
10,584
Forgive me , i understand that times are testing and in no way is this directed at you or your personal circumstances , but to me the issue seems to be , all this consulting malarchy , to the unions and whatever bodies , its gone bizzare to the ridiculous in my view all too often an employer whether it be private or government sets the criteria and agenda and working conditions, the employees either agree to abide by the agenda or they dont , no way should an employee or its affilliate body have any sway over that , they dont want to work under the conditions set , fine change the employees. Lets see what a few months without salary feels like , Sometimes we dont know how lucky we are and we can all to often get complacent once our feet are under the table .........................although intensive at times teaching isnt exactly like working down the pit , or slave labouish , sometimes i sit back and see easily how the asian countries and even third world countries will be ovetaking us , we have become far too complacent and have to high expectations. We are supposed to be rebuilding our economy , and creating growth when others seem **** bent on destroying an already batteed system , As i say its not directed at anyone in paticular just those **** bent on ruining what we are trying to rebuild , lets give it whirl and if there are teething problems we deal with them as and when they arise ....................rant over
 
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Messages
5,376
Are pubs prepared for a release from the lockdown?
If not I bet they are within a week.
Schools have had ample time for contingency plans and they (well someone) is/are dragging their feet
Not aimed at any one in particular
 

highlander

Centenary Club
Messages
4,938
My point in responding in this thread earlier was to highlight, as Loz has above, just how ****** the UK is constantly stuck in consultation, complaining and negotiation. Germany and Denmark managed to get schools back in 3 weeks with no fuss or backchat, the same notice ours were given but could we do it? No, every Tom, dick and Harry has to stick their 2p in about how it is not time, it is too risky, who should get in........the debacle over this just evidences to me the UK is a spent force on a downward spiral.
Now, where is my gin! ;)
 

Silvercat

Member
Messages
697
Forgive me , i understand that times are testing and in no way is this directed at you or your personal circumstances , but to me the issue seems to be , all this consulting malarchy , to the unions and whatever bodies , its in my gone bizzare to the ridiculous in my view all too often , an employer whether it be private or government sets the criteria and agenda and working conditions, the employees either agree to abide by the agenda or they dont , no way should an employee or its affilliate body have any sway over that , they dont want to work under the conditions set , fine change the employees. Lets see what a few months without salary feels like , Sometimes we dont know how lucky we are and we can all to often get complacent once our feet are under the table .........................although intensive at times teaching isnt exactly like working down the pit , or slave labouish , sometimes i sit back and see easily how the asian countries and even third world countries will be ovetaking us , we have become far too complacent and have to high expectations. We are supposed to be rebuilding our economy , and creating growth when others seem ** bent on destroying an already batteed system , As i say its not directed at anyone in paticular just those ** bent on ruining what we are trying to rebuild , lets give it whirl and if there are teething problems we deal with them as and when they arise ....................rant over
Spot on Loz!
 

spkennyuk

Member
Messages
4,497
Are pubs prepared for a release from the lockdown?
If not I bet they are within a week.
Schools have had ample time for contingency plans and they (well someone) is/are dragging their feet
Not aimed at any one in particular
Its going to take pubs around 3 weeks to be able to get cask ales and keg beers back in the supply chain.

Most pubs have still got a cellar full of spoiled stock that we cant dispose of or have uplifted until we are allowed to do so. (Long story but its a farce)

Micro breweries were flourishing prior to Corvid. I have no doubt that some will not survive. Long story again but its not been viable for many to switch from cask production to bottled production to keep them going.

Once lock down is lifted its going to take around 1 week to get the raw materials into the breweries. You then have to add the brew time of 2 weeks for the quick brew products. Your then looking at at least a week to get those cask and keg products into the supply chain and to the pubs in limited supplies.

Most pubs are ready and able to open within 24/48 hrs of being given the ok to do so. They will however mostly be offering bottled beers (Longer shelf life) wines and spirits for the first 3 to 5 weeks after the lock down is lifted.

If there is a second spike and lockdown period the whole process above would be back to square one.

There are many other issues around the pub industry that mean some pubs will just not survive the next 12 months. The knock on effect of corvid will continue for a long time to come across many sectors of business.

One of the key differences for the pub trade is that for a large percentage of pub tenants and freehold pubs. If the business fails its not just their job they have lost its also their home.

As for the schools. The one thing i have not seen in any of the thread is any mention of the children who are at risk. Its not just key workers children still being schooled. Obviously this varies from school to school. There may be zero in one school and 50 in another. The point being its not just key workers children that have been attending school during the lockdown.
 

MarkMas

Member
Messages
3,476
Whatever you point of view on this, your criticism should not be aimed at “teachers” it should be aimed at the school management / heads / deity heads etc.
One of my daughters is a teacher and has absolutely no input on how the school manage this crisis, infact right now she doesn’t even know is she has to go into the school next week or work from home, she is still waiting for that email.
Much in the same way she has no input in the Union discussion as they have not been asked, the union leaders are out there making a noise but have yet to ask the teachers what they think.
My daughters union official is not very contactable because they are working from home !!
I agree that the teachers (in general) are not at fault. But also the problem is not always 'management'. The head and assistant head of our little primary school have been working long hours to try to sort out how to reopen the school, but they can't just 'get it done' in the way that, say, a pub can. They are hemmed in by regulations and edicts from central and local government. They are trying to cope with constantly-changing requirements, not just because 'the powers' are evil, dumb, lazy, or whatever is the latest moan, but because the actual situation is actually complex and actually changing. They are spending (wasting) 25% of their time dealing with parents, who all have their own crazy ideas and conspiracies about what is 'absolutely safe'. They have the health and safety jobsworths breathing down their necks, expecting 'absolute safety'. They have Ofsted to worry about, where a single misplaced bit of paper can result in a school failing and inspection, and (in a small school) risking closure. They have the unions giving them a hard time, with one union writing to heads saying that the head would be personally and criminally liable if any teacher ever became ill.

Doubtless there are some lazy, dumb, evil teachers and heads, but most are doing their best, and are being hampered in every possible way in a difficult situation, and would be depressed to hear that bystanders are complaining about them.
 

Davidt99

Member
Messages
134
Any teachers that refuse to go back to teaching at school are basically on strike and as such they should no longer be eligible for furlough payments. I wonder though how many teachers feel that they are being accurately represented by their unions who by their own admission are anti government.
 

MarkMas

Member
Messages
3,476
Any teachers that refuse to go back to teaching at school are basically on strike and as such they should no longer be eligible for furlough payments. I wonder though how many teachers feel that they are being accurately represented by their unions who by their own admission are anti government.
Any teachers that are asked to go back to teaching at school are no longer on furlough and so obviously no longer be eligible for furlough payments.

Anyone who feels that their workplace is unsafe can report this to the HSE and refuse to attend work, but they risk dismissal and having to make their case for unfair dismissal at a tribunal.
 

Delmonte

Member
Messages
504
Blame Blair , we taught and trained them that to be Woke and it was fine and was going to be the new norm in the name of liberalism , now they have grown into teachers and practicising it in our schools of our grandkids , some of us new it was ludicrous and an unealistic utopia , time to wake up and smell the coffee before its too late , its seveely affected the univesities lecturers as Jordan Petersen has been harping on about
Bring back the birch/national service/decent world war/ pubs closing during the day/ etc that'll sort em out
 

Oneball

Member
Messages
3,052
I deleted other things I’d posted here but I’ve got to say something.

This is the first time I’ve felt completely out of touch with those here. I utterly fail to understand the lack of consideration shown by those who in general seem to have been working from home to those who have been continuing to work in the outside world.