Pic of the day

Messages
1,383
My Dad was in 3 PARA back in the early 50's and his Brigadier was called Darling, Sir Kenneth T Darling or Katie to his troops... he was a bit of a legend. As far as I'm aware he was not related to a penpusher in the AGC in WW1.


Oh and there was a Pine-COffin in the Paras too... I thought my dad was making these up... but apparently not...
I'd heard of Pine-Coffin. Probably in connection with Pegasus Bridge.
What I can't understand is why he remained a Lt. Colonel from 1942 until retirement, thirteen years later.
He'd had what was called a 'good war', I think. He was in the thick of the action and proved himself time and again,
as an excellent leader. He got his share of 'tin' and latterly a Knighthood. It just intrigues me is all. He ought to have
made Brigadier General, at least. I suspect there's a story there, but one we'll never know.
 

RodTungsten

Member
Messages
132
My Dad was in 3 PARA back in the early 50's and his Brigadier was called Darling, Sir Kenneth T Darling or Katie to his troops... he was a bit of a legend. As far as I'm aware he was not related to a penpusher in the AGC in WW1.


Oh and there was a Pine-COffin in the Paras too... I thought my dad was making these up... but apparently not...
Pine-Coffin: my father talked of him as he was with 17 Para in Palestine “keeping the peace…”Took him to Aldershot with the kids when the museum was there and he spotted himself in as a very young lad in a regimental photograph there.
 

BennyD

Sea Urchin Pate
Messages
14,771
Like a lot of worthy people, he very likely p!ssed off the office-wallahs in Whitehall. Paddy Maine (SAS) was another; 4 DSOs but never a VC. Albert Jacka VC was another; he should have got a second VC but he was too critical of management. If you google him, you'll realise the MC he got at Poziers was even more impressive than his VC action at Gallipoli. C'est la vie.
 

BennyD

Sea Urchin Pate
Messages
14,771
I feel your pain! Fwiw, men age like wine, women age like milk.
Harry, what's your problem? Haven't your balls dropped or something? Fyi, it's the eternal struggle of men v the antichrist with tits. At least you haven't got a Ferrari; with that attitude and a dancing donkey you would be nigh on f*cking intolerable. X
 

Harry

Member
Messages
615
Harry, what's your problem? Haven't your balls dropped or something? Fyi, it's the eternal struggle of men v the antichrist with tits. At least you haven't got a Ferrari; with that attitude and a dancing donkey you would be nigh on f*cking intolerable. X
Thank you darrrling! Happy birthday to Sue xx
 
Messages
1,383
Like a lot of worthy people, he very likely p!ssed off the office-wallahs in Whitehall. Paddy Maine (SAS) was another; 4 DSOs but never a VC. Albert Jacka VC was another; he should have got a second VC but he was too critical of management. If you google him, you'll realise the MC he got at Poziers was even more impressive than his VC action at Gallipoli. C'est la vie.
As a paratrooper, in most armies you're called upon to achieve tasks that you wouldn't give a regular infantry unit.
And to do so with a smaller unit than you would choose in an ideal world. So, paratroopers are by nature, tougher, more resilient and more deadly. They set themselves apart from the rest of the Army and anyone who isn't a paratrooper, is a 'cr@p hat'. Paratroopers were a new concept in the British Army during WWII and regarded with a degree of ambivalence. Pine-Coffin may not have had to do anything, other than be a para officer, to be passed over by promotions boards. Pure speculation on my part. To understand how special the Parachute Regiment is, watch the recent Falklands documentary that focuses on Goose Green to Stanley. This was the first time that I'd heard exactly how many Argentines were dug in at Goose Green and when I heard the numbers I almost fell over laughing at how lucky the Paras were, not to have been wiped out.
As regards Paddy Maine. He seemed to have only two settings. Unexploded and exploding. Churchill enthusiastically backed irregular forces aka commandos, because he'd witnessed how successful the Boer irregulars were against the British a few decades earlier. While the SAS achieved results out of all proportion to their numbers, they were untouchable. But, come the German surrender, they were chopped post haste, by Generals who couldn't wait to wield the axe. Being an Ulsterman and unconventional, never won you friends in the British Army and still doesn't.
 
Last edited: