Potential Maserati Owner

Messages
4
#1
I've gone through a few cars in my 28 years of driving. Relatively Recent past was my first Ferrari, a 2005 612 Scaglietti followed by a low mileage 1999 F355 F1
After becoming over paranoid about where to park, and following a trip to the gravel trap at silverstone in the F355, I decided to relieve some stress and change.
I then went Mercedes S600 LWB. That was nice, but kept going wrong, so I swapped it for an almost new M5 4.4, which I had for 3 years until recently.
After owning the M5 for a while I had some kind of epiphany that I really didn't need a silly car anymore. Before I sold the M5 I did think of swapping into a Grantourismo, but it seemed to much theatre and not so user friendly gearbox for an every day car.
So for the last year or so, I've gone pretty much full sensible. A Mercedes C350 estate and a Hyundai I800 (too many children)
I've had a spare fun car a few times before, and it never lasted very long, but, that seems to be where my head is leading me back to. A bit of theatre and fun for the occasional drive.
Hence the forum joining, I'm back looking at Maserati's as they are very good value
I'm currently trying to buy a 2002 Coupe Cambiocorsa. 78000 miles, with history, not seen it yet, but looks lovely.
Not sure if this is the correct place to ask about a specific Maserati. but my questions are really surrounding the Cambiocorsa box. I know that the later grantourismo didnt go dual clutch, so it gets the lurchy thing going on, parking etc, which I understand and can live with.
Is the cambiocorsa box pretty much the same as a grantourismo would be, or is it radically different, more or less user friendly etc?
Is there a sport button that makes more exhaust noise in the 2002 cambiocorsa?

Let me know if I need to post queries about specific cars somewhere else.

In the meantime, thanks for having me :)
 
Messages
27,984
#2
Hi Gareth and welcome.

The 2 systems are connected and basically the same. Not dual clutch but dual plate (which is not dual clutch)

I would say that the later GTS MC system is better in that it last longer, give less agro and is not terminal when it goes...you can sort of limp home where as the 4200 based CC system is terminal when it fails. With the GTS MC system you get plenty of warning and very predictably last circa 40k miles.

The 4200 CC system can fail at any point from 12-50k miles without warning. OK, some of this can be put down to a dodgy batch of VALEO clutches it would appear but if you think, the later MC system has more developement and thus is better I would say that this is a fair assumption.

Go drive both. The 4.7MC Shift GranTursimos are criminally cheap at the moment and surely at the bottom of their curve.
 
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6,543
#3
Welcome Gareth.
My first was a 2002 4200 cambio corsa and loved the rawness of the early original gearbox but its not to everyone's taste but for me I preferred it to my later 04 4200 cambio corsa with the softend gear changes in my opinion to make it more favourable to someone who can only drive an Auto.
Sport mode should be mandatory.
Valved silencers only on the GS.
 
Messages
4
#5
Welcome Gareth.
My first was a 2002 4200 cambio corsa and loved the rawness of the early original gearbox but its not to everyone's taste but for me I preferred it to my later 04 4200 cambio corsa with the softend gear changes in my opinion to make it more favourable to someone who can only drive an Auto.
Sport mode should be mandatory.
Valved silencers only on the GS.
Interesting, as you've had two early CC's
I found the F355 robotic manual surprisingly user friendly. When I drove a 2008 Grantourismo it seemed to lack a savage option of gear change, like on an F430 or Lamborghini. I quite like savage as you can manage the savage by choosing when to change
Would you say the 2002 was more instant and quick changing than the softened version? But maybe still a way off a super quick DCT Bmw or savage F430?
I was supposed to be driving it today but the dealer put me off, yesterday it was a family issue, today he says he found an oil leak.

Not filling me with confidence just yet
 
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6,543
#6
I have driven the later Maserati as I was a technician for them for 2 years in NZ.
I have also had a Ferrari 360 F1 Modena an 04 and loved that.
Never driven the BMW ones but have a few Lamborghini's.
I like driving and do hard and not yet destroyed a clutch !
 

outrun

Centenary Club
Messages
3,643
#9
For savage mode you need a race button which means you need an MC Stradale. Somewhat more to buy than a 4200 but still a ridiculous bargain compared to the likes of Ferrari or Lambo.
 
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8,312
#10
I've had a 4200 CC and a GTS MC Shift, and they are two very different cars.

The 4200 is a point and squirt type of car, whereas the GTS is a cruiser and will effortlessly do long mileages.

Having said that, they both shift when required. All depends what you want it for.
 
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272
#11
I've had a 4200 CC and a GTS MC Shift, and they are two very different cars.

The 4200 is a point and squirt type of car, whereas the GTS is a cruiser and will effortlessly do long mileages.

Having said that, they both shift when required. All depends what you want it for.
Interested to see you describe the GTS as a cruiser Mark. To my mind that would make it more suited to the Auto box whereas forum owners mostly prefer the MC Shift automated manual.

Does the MC Handling suspension option make the GTS a sportier drive? I'm thinking this suspension with the MC Shift box might do as a poor mans Stradale.
 
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491
#14
I dont doubt any of these replies as my experience is basedon one Maserati only - the GranSport. I dont have neck-jerking shifts with its Cambio Corsa robotised manual gearbox, albeit with a single clutch. Thats in either Sports or normal manual mode. I guess it has something to do with having it setup correctly in the first place.

I'd suggest you pose your questions to Richard Grace from whom I bought my GranSport. I can confirm sport button in GranSport stiffens the suspension, changes the transmission control unit (tcu) gearshifts to make them quicker and opens the valved rear boxes to give a deeper growling exhaudt note.

No experience with any other model of Maserati but Richard will probably guide you through the maze of choices and hopefully help you decide. He can also sourc
e a good car (whichever model you decide) for you.

Good luck.
 
Messages
8,312
#15
Interested to see you describe the GTS as a cruiser Mark. To my mind that would make it more suited to the Auto box whereas forum owners mostly prefer the MC Shift automated manual.

Does the MC Handling suspension option make the GTS a sportier drive? I'm thinking this suspension with the MC Shift box might do as a poor mans Stradale.
I guess cruiser is a bit pigeonholeing the GTS MC Shift. It’s more than that. It’s too big to be a car car you can thrash around country lanes, like a 4200 could.
However on wide sweeping A roads or like the roads around Le Mans the GTS MC Shift is in its absolute element. The drives I had in it this year are some of the best drives I’ve ever had.
It’s where the car is at home.
A 4200 CC would also be at home but no where near as composed.

I wouldn’t call it a poor mans Strad either. It is what it is. A Strad is a step up.
You wouldn’t call a 911 Turbo a poor mans GT3 RS.
 
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2,682
#16
Thread drift alert, but, talking of 911’s...

I went to buy a Porsche today (more of that when the car arrives), and while I was chatting about “my” new car, I saw a very lovely series one 996 GT3 in yellow. A proper UK car (one of only 106, of which many have been crashed, tracked, modified, etc) completely unmolested, 2 owners, FSH, about 45k miles. Price is circa £62k. Now, thinking medium term (5-10 years), could this be a bargain, and something rare to add to a collection? Surely this will appreciate, won’t it?
 
Messages
8,312
#17
Thread drift alert, but, talking of 911’s...

I went to buy a Porsche today (more of that when the car arrives), and while I was chatting about “my” new car, I saw a very lovely series one 996 GT3 in yellow. A proper UK car (one of only 106, of which many have been crashed, tracked, modified, etc) completely unmolested, 2 owners, FSH, about 45k miles. Price is circa £62k. Now, thinking medium term (5-10 years), could this be a bargain, and something rare to add to a collection? Surely this will appreciate, won’t it?
There’s a 22k one up for sale at near £100k!
 
Messages
4,685
#18
Thread drift alert, but, talking of 911’s...

I went to buy a Porsche today (more of that when the car arrives), and while I was chatting about “my” new car, I saw a very lovely series one 996 GT3 in yellow. A proper UK car (one of only 106, of which many have been crashed, tracked, modified, etc) completely unmolested, 2 owners, FSH, about 45k miles. Price is circa £62k. Now, thinking medium term (5-10 years), could this be a bargain, and something rare to add to a collection? Surely this will appreciate, won’t it?
Good buy indeed.....potentially great buy....I'd buy it for sure.
 
Messages
491
#19
There is no such thing as a cheap Porsche, especially when it comes to a Turbo or GT3.
Price spread on GT3 is determined by specification (Club Sport or Comfort or Comfort with CS seats options plus roll cage with fire extinguisher option as examples) and history, as many have been bent, not repaired on insurance so dont show up on HPI and condition. Prices for GT3 cars have also softened. Investment? Not sure......
 

Lavazza

Junior Member
Messages
30
#20
Thread drift alert, but, talking of 911’s...

I went to buy a Porsche today (more of that when the car arrives), and while I was chatting about “my” new car, I saw a very lovely series one 996 GT3 in yellow. A proper UK car (one of only 106, of which many have been crashed, tracked, modified, etc) completely unmolested, 2 owners, FSH, about 45k miles. Price is circa £62k. Now, thinking medium term (5-10 years), could this be a bargain, and something rare to add to a collection? Surely this will appreciate, won’t it?
In clean, unmodified state, a MK1 GT3 is a great car. I owned a MK1 GT3 CS (M003) and had about 17k trouble free miles. I shouldn't have sold it, but I was approached via a forum and a deal was done.

I'd consider going back to one, but really lovely examples aren't too plentiful. It's true that values have softened a fair bit, but longer term I think any Mezger engine cars with manual transmission are good news. Much better value than the air-cooled cars (and I say that, having owned and enjoyed 964 and 993).