3D printing

Nayf

Member
Messages
1,264
While I don’t own a classic-era Maserati I’m well aware of the parts problems - particularly for the 80s/90s era. I’ve plenty of sympathy - as I one day aspire to a Ghibli Cup (which was originally why I kept hanging around this place, absorbing info, long after the journalistic need subsided...) but also because my 16-year-old Alfa is increasing constructed from unobtanium. There’s an interesting article in this month’s Classic & Sportscar on 3D printing. Has anyone looked into this before, particularly with regards to Ghibli IIs?

I won’t post up the article - but a2p2.co.uk is the firm mentioned.
I only raise this after last week’s blast in the Ghibli Cup got me looking at buying guides. £5000 for a Cup turbo - each - plus the costs of the headlights and various other bits rather hollowed out my stomach a bit...
 

spkennyuk

Member
Messages
4,856
While I don’t own a classic-era Maserati I’m well aware of the parts problems - particularly for the 80s/90s era. I’ve plenty of sympathy - as I one day aspire to a Ghibli Cup (which was originally why I kept hanging around this place, absorbing info, long after the journalistic need subsided...) but also because my 16-year-old Alfa is increasing constructed from unobtanium. There’s an interesting article in this month’s Classic & Sportscar on 3D printing. Has anyone looked into this before, particularly with regards to Ghibli IIs?

I won’t post up the article - but a2p2.co.uk is the firm mentioned.
I only raise this after last week’s blast in the Ghibli Cup got me looking at buying guides. £5000 for a Cup turbo - each - plus the costs of the headlights and various other bits rather hollowed out my stomach a bit...
Delve a little deeper into the A2P2 website and you find they are already making some Maserati suspension parts.

They seem to have various options including casting to reverse engineer and fabricate parts.
 

Maurizio

New Member
Messages
27
I have made quite a few 3D parts for my 2.24v.
I'm an engineer and I have access to laser scan, 3D CAD, and I source 3D printing out mostly to HP Jetfusion 3DP services that after years of experience in 3D prototyping I find to be the best for this job.

These are some of the parts that I've done for my car:

'Lids' for the air box (redesigned part to the right)
74030
74031

More to follow...
 

Maurizio

New Member
Messages
27
Replacement with o-ring improvement for the oil vapour recycling hoses.
74032

The o-ring successfully replaces the metallic clamp, stops all oil leakage and makes removal of the part easy.
(this is an early version - to stop every leak I'm now using a series of two)
74033

To match my part I have designed and 3D printed hose, cut the original under the metal clamp that holds it to the engine head cover, and assembled.
The grey 3D printed part has been painted black
74034

Final result (it had to be improved, later on, as the junction between the original hose and the grey part in the above picture still leaked)
74035
Final result. I have the 3D of the whole hose rady but 3D print it in Thermoplastic Urethane would still be too expensive
 

Maurizio

New Member
Messages
27
'Raschiavetro', whatever it's called in English (the rough translation as 'glass scraper' sounds atrocious :D) . A very difficult project that required 3D laser scan of the original part, section reconstruction, finding a suitable source of velvet stripe, and a quite a lot of testing, but with excellent final results IMHO.
Only small drawback the part conists of 3 pieces joined together. Hardly noticeable though.

74036

Velvet insertion and detail of the junction between pieces.
74037

I've designed the part so that it can be properly attached to the door with self tapping screws.


74038

In place:
74039
 

Maurizio

New Member
Messages
27
And this is the mother of all my work on my 2.24v:
complete redesign of the infamous fusible holder box.
Here, 3D printing was only used to check the proper assembly of the board inside one existing fuse box, before committing to the final design of the PCB and all that comes with it.
This project required a few hundred hours and I expect to have the first test prototype in a couple of months.

Laser scan and first 3D positioning of fastons and PCB:
74040

Mock up
74041

Electromechanical design complete. Fuses replaced with modern ATO fuses.
74042

Final PCB (will be prototyped next month). I had to study the whole electrical harness of the car to determine current loads for each PCB track...
74043

Once ready (and tested) it is my intention to make and sell the complete part.
If you read Italian or are happy with google translation you can follow the developemtns on the Italian Maserati site 'www.repartocorse2.com':
 

Zep

Moderator
Messages
5,128
Fantastic work, it is great that people with skills like yours can create these parts to keep
our cars working.

I will have a read through the RC2 pages!