Perfection

Ewan

Member
Messages
4,714
The Shamal exhaust does ground out. But not particularly worse than the Cup. Both were pretty useless on the bumpy and undulating rural roads around me, and that definitely played a part in me selling them.
The Strad, with its stiff suspension, gets thrown off line on the same roads, but doesn't ground out.
Of my recent Masers, I'd say the GS makes the best fist of attacking my local roads.
 

Nayf

Member
Messages
1,541
Had the choice and went for the Cup. Better driveability, less made and to be honest bump into one which I couldn’t let go. Don’t get me wrong, Shamal is the Uber biturbo in looks and hope to have one at some stage but for sure not the better car out of the Biturbo era. Obviously biased view.
I agree. The Shamal is the better GT car.
The Cup handles better, and is a bit more of an immersive driving experience through the steering wheel. It can do the GT thing, but not quite as well as the Shamal.

Personally I’d go for the Cup for the steering feel and handling. Doesn’t mean I wouldn’t want a Shamal too, mind…
 

Mr S

Member
Messages
698
The Shamal exhaust does ground out. But not particularly worse than the Cup. Both were pretty useless on the bumpy and undulating rural roads around me, and that definitely played a part in me selling them.
The Strad, with its stiff suspension, gets thrown off line on the same roads, but doesn't ground out.
Of my recent Masers, I'd say the GS makes the best fist of attacking my local roads.
Where abouts do you live Ewan?
 

general_piffle

Junior Member
Messages
173
Well, it’s all relative these prices but 60-70K Euros for a LHD Cup with good specs isnt that unreasonable. Real good LHD GT’s sell for 30K these days (real paid price if you are not in a hurry) if it isn’t an ex Japan car. It will be more difficult overtime to find a standard Cup with low mileage and history and sure it will go further up as we have seen with limited editions Integrales etc. Matter of time imo
Why the lack of love for cars formerly from Japan? Aesthetic differences are just a matter of a headlight swap if you really want to, and the Japanese are typically very fastidious about maintaining their cars. So they’ve often been pampered. Plus of course the benefits of no salt on the roads making UK levels of rot almost unheard of in Japan.

I know when the guys at Emblem checked mine over 5 years ago when I first got her they were amazed not to find any rust anywhere, and couldn’t believe how clean the car was underneath.