Sub £60k Ferrari?

Nayf

Junior Member
Messages
237
#22
The thing is with the 348 is that in period it actually reviewed quite well. It developed its reputation through the owners, some of which - let's be honest, a fair few - may have been more interested in the badge than the way the car drives. Compare the original Clarkson Top Gear video with his later ones, for example.

I quite like the idea of a dangerous car – after all, it's a mid-engined V8 Ferrari. I've yet to drive one – I'm too tall – but as exciting as the F355 was that I drove, it didn't quite have that serrated-edge rawness that I'd been expecting. I got out of it (eventually, after much ligament groaning) thinking I'd much rather have a 4200/GranSport. Same level of thrills, but a much nicer place to be.

The 348 isn't perfect, and it came in just in time for a massive recession and huge financial turmoil for all luxury car firms, which did cause 348 life cycle and fit and finish development problems. IIRC Ferrari had to offer a 30 per cent haircut on the Testarossa and part shutdown the factory, and Porsche very nearly went bust. But it does seem raw, visceral and in some ways pure in away that perhaps Ferraris haven't been for a while.

I've heard similar criticisms of the Clio V6 – and the Maserati BiTurbo/Ghibli II/3200 manual, especially in the wet – and I can't help but get the feeling that just because a car is challenging to drive, does not make it bad. If anything, it makes it more of a driver's car* – engaging, exciting, thrilling and all the better for it. The TVR factor, so to speak...

Otherwise we'd all drive Golfs or 911 Carrera 4s. And that would be bad.


*There are many definitions of this.
 
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Nayf

Junior Member
Messages
237
#25
The Gen 1 V6 Clio were hideous Nayf. Second gen much better.
I do prefer the styling of the later cars, and the power-to-weight compares a little more favourably against the 182 Cup, but I just want to see how much is hyperbole.
 
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50,148
#26
The 348 isn't that quick these days is it ? A modern hot hatch is probably as quick....ok I know it's not about that. I do like the 348 though.
 

Nayf

Junior Member
Messages
237
#27
The 348 isn't that quick these days is it ? A modern hot hatch is probably as quick....ok I know it's not about that. I do like the 348 though.
Steering feel, lack of sound deadening, engine note, naturally aspirated vs fi, mid engined feel, rwd - it will feel much faster much slower.
 

allandwf

Centenary Club
Messages
7,284
#28
(A welcome distraction.) I love my 348, for all the above. It is raw, no power steering, manual with dogleg 1st so you have to remember, very rigid. Steering once on the go is superb, but hard work at times, it has no frills or compromises. It is also tiny, its actually shorter than a Dino! On paper it's about 1/2 second slower to 60 than my old Assetto Corsa, and just a couple mph slower top speed, not bad for a car 10 year older. Power delivery is obviously different, still miss the twin turbo kick, but once its on twisty back roads it is great fun, and you will not come anywhere near to the reported bad traits anywhere other than a track. The Assetto Corsa was a car you could jump in and drive and arrive reasonably relaxed, but needed care in the wet. The 348 you need to be aware at all times, and not so relaxed, but wasn't bought for that, it was bought for fun, and, for me, ticks all boxes.
 
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Messages
4,575
#30
(A welcome distraction.) I love my 348, for all the above. It is raw, no power steering, manual with dogleg 1st so you have to remember, very rigid. Steering once on the go is superb, but hard work at times, it has no frills or compromises. It is also tiny, its actually shorter than a Dino! On paper it's about 1/2 second slower to 60 than my old Assetto Corsa, and just a couple mph slower top speed, not bad for a car 10 year older. Power delivery is obviously different, still miss the twin turbo kick, but once its on twisty back roads it is great fun, and you will not come anywhere near to the reported bad traits anywhere other than a track. The Assetto Corsa was a car you could jump in and drive and arrive reasonably relaxed, but needed care in the wet. The 348 you need to be aware at all times, and not so relaxed, but wasn't bought for that, it was bought for fun, and, for me, ticks all boxes.
This is the point for me to have one of those kind of flawed genius cars. They are not perfect but have some great traits that are personal to the owner. It is all subjective. Most non-enthusiast owners would not understand, appreciate or put up with this. Their loss....our gain.

The 348 I've never drove so can't comment on how it drives. It is a great a typical Ferrari well packaged car. With mid engine, RWD, smaller and lighter....what's not to like. It is a good looking car to me now and we'll proportioned. I wasn't a fan when it came out new but I think it has aged well and looks good now.

Yes, I'm sure they are outgunned and outperformed by modern cars but what would you rather be in for a 3rd car? I'd take a 348 over a modern fast hatch, saloon or coupe if it was to be a fun 3rd car.

Enjoy it Allan...now more than ever
 

zagatoes30

Centenary Club
Messages
10,869
#31
Fulvia has a dog leg box :)

It also has that rawness, you have to drive it and when you do it rewards in spades - back to my previous comments much more fun and smiles that later high performance cars
 

zagatoes30

Centenary Club
Messages
10,869
#33
The 308 is presumably priced out of this discussion? Shame. Love 'em.
Never been a fan of the 308 or 328, never sure why but it just doesn't excite me. The 308 GT4 on the other hand has always tempted me, so should have bought one when they were £10k - he ho, live and learn
 

Felonious Crud

Centenary Club
Messages
11,007
#34
Maybe I just watched Magnum PI too much as a lad. :)

The 'proper' switches in the 308 are what I love. Has a waft of old-school authenticity about it.
 

Felonious Crud

Centenary Club
Messages
11,007
#36
He had to have a Targa but with the roof always off as the headspace was vertically challenged.
Maybe north-west Europe isn't the ideal place for a car with limited headroom and a removable roof, then. Which is lucky, really - I've just looked at the prices.
 
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1,001
#38
Never been a fan of the 308 or 328, never sure why but it just doesn't excite me. The 308 GT4 on the other hand has always tempted me, so should have bought one when they were £10k - he ho, live and learn
I’ve wanted a 308 GT4 since I saw a yellow one on a forecourt when I was about 12. I’ve always loved wedge shaped cars with pop-ups, hence my love affair with the Lotus Esprit, but a wedge Ferrari with two useable back seats, what’s not to like? Like you, feel I may have missed the boat now, although maybe values could come back a bit over the next few years. Wish they’d made one with an auto box as I now struggle with driving manuals.
 

zagatoes30

Centenary Club
Messages
10,869
#40
I’ve wanted a 308 GT4 since I saw a yellow one on a forecourt when I was about 12. I’ve always loved wedge shaped cars with pop-ups
Agreed most of the cars I love have angular straights edges, Lancia Fulvia, Alfa Romeo GTV (70/80s) and the 308 GT4 obviously I am a child of those times. Just had a quick mooch and one could be had for circa £50k