Paintwork

rockits

Member
Messages
6,129
Wow that is not great. I reckon a smart repair could be done on that well enough you would barely notice.
 

Ebenezer

Member
Messages
1,917
Had clear coat peeling off my bonnet and around the front wheel arches, plus alot of chips on the front and bonnet so repainted the lot. I suspected that the clear coat peeling was certianly encouraged by pressure washing but couldn't prove it, so kept shtum. Interested to see if the clear coat can be repaired without a respray as I've got another couple of very small spots where it's come off on the A pillar and roof.
Eb
 

conaero

Forum Owner
Messages
29,708
Get some cutting compound and polish the area under the flaking. If it comes up shinny then the door has been scuffed and relaquered and obviously not well enough hence the flaking.

This will indicate a repair lower down on the panel and this is where they have painted the damaged area and lacquered the whole panel, ergo the area that flaked is lacquer over lacquer.

To repair lacquer flake is very very difficult and usually requires the entire area to be base coated and painted again.
 

Alexpie

Member
Messages
128
Only time I've seen something like that happen before, (And have seen it happen a few times) is when the pressure washer has been held too close to the car on a too higher pressure setting, and on the edges it blasted off the lacquer and caused it to flake like that.

Regarding a solution, as above.. if you want it perfect you'd be looking at respraying the door, as you can't really repair that locally. PPF could work but you might have inconsistencies in terms of the finish compared to the paint, and it may stand out a bit. Although, applying a ceramic coating on top of PPF may help it be a bit more glossy and 'paint-like'.
 

ChrisQP09

Member
Messages
1,866
Only time I've seen something like that happen before, (And have seen it happen a few times) is when the pressure washer has been held too close to the car on a too higher pressure setting, and on the edges it blasted off the lacquer and caused it to flake like that.

Regarding a solution, as above.. if you want it perfect you'd be looking at respraying the door, as you can't really repair that locally. PPF could work but you might have inconsistencies in terms of the finish compared to the paint, and it may stand out a bit. Although, applying a ceramic coating on top of PPF may help it be a bit more glossy and 'paint-like'.
I would live with it as it stands ifI get ppf on it! I just dont want it peeling more, so damage limitation.

In other news, just finished cleaning !
 

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ChrisQP09

Member
Messages
1,866
Wow that is not great. I reckon a smart repair could be done on that well enough you would barely notice.
It looks worst than it actually is. I suspect that one of the cleaning products I used may not be 'PH Neutral', which could have actually lifted the clear coat like paint stripper.

What would be involved with a smart repair?
 

ChrisQP09

Member
Messages
1,866
Had clear coat peeling off my bonnet and around the front wheel arches, plus alot of chips on the front and bonnet so repainted the lot. I suspected that the clear coat peeling was certianly encouraged by pressure washing but couldn't prove it, so kept shtum. Interested to see if the clear coat can be repaired without a respray as I've got another couple of very small spots where it's come off on the A pillar and roof.
Eb
Did you get round to sorting the peel out?
 

ChrisQP09

Member
Messages
1,866
@Alexpie Do you think there will be a noticeable difference in appearence between the front and rear sections without PPF compared to PPF is applied to the doors?
 

ChrisQP09

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1,866
Ok, decided to scrap the PPF option and go with a full respray to the affected door, the front passenger door, some of the a-pillar/roof line and rear 3/4 panel for blending.

Gotta keep the mistress in tip top shape. I assume the paint shop can source the paint code from the chassis number?
 

Alexpie

Member
Messages
128
@Alexpie Do you think there will be a noticeable difference in appearence between the front and rear sections without PPF compared to PPF is applied to the doors?
Sorry, I only just saw this. I think generally PPF would give a duller finish than paint. But I see above you've decided to go the respray route, which I think is the best option! Regarding the paint code i'm not 100% sure, but a quick google came up with the following:


59736
59737
 

Nibby

Member
Messages
604
Ok I noticed this lifting of what appears to be the clear coat of the paintwork? Looks worst than it is.

I was powerhosing the car but never seen this before and its locslised to this area! What are my options?

I have already got a quote for PPFing the doors however can this be sorted without a complete respray?
Myself I would get someone to put a clearcoat on it and with a bit of expertise lose the line best they can, hopefully look a lot better especially as the colour of your car might be a pain to match and run the risk of the door colour different from the panels either side of that door.
 

ChrisQP09

Member
Messages
1,866
Myself I would get someone to put a clearcoat on it and with a bit of expertise lose the line best they can, hopefully look a lot better especially as the colour of your car might be a pain to match and run the risk of the door colour different from the panels either side of that door.
The adjecent door and rear quarter panel are being repainted too. The colour cant really be that different can it? If they use my paint code?
 

Nibby

Member
Messages
604
The adjecent door and rear quarter panel are being repainted too. The colour cant really be that different can it? If they use my paint code?
If they're blending in with the other panels that's a different story.
Regarding colour matching it can be a right pain even with the code, other times using the code can be fine, for some reason silver seems the worse to match, any slight discrepancies and doing just one panel seems to highlight this. Anyone having a car resprayed I always say it's worth having an extra couple of litres after it's been resprayed just in case you need to do any bodywork in the future
 

flat-12

Junior Member
Messages
59
I've owned over 100 cars in my life, most of them high performance types, or unique and unusual, etc....and I'm VERY fussy about cosmetics. Sometimes paintwork is an unavoidable fact of life. When I needed it done, I would ask other people with high end cars or custom cars....who did their paint? It always boiled down to only 2 or 3 body shops that had the skills and knowledge to do high end paint repairs. I had a ZR-1 Corvette in medium blue metallic that needed the left-front hood repaired. I took it to a paint shop about an hours drive away, because I'd heard the painter was a true artist. He practiced painting several plastic panels and dried them in the sun, until he got he exact shade of blue and the metallic content just right. He then repaired the hood and blended into the doors, matching the factory orange peel texture and blue color. It looked awesome and I actually paid him a hefty tip because I was so happy with the results. In certain lighting conditions, I could tell what was done, but nobody else could unless I pointed it out to them. It was darn near perfect. But the best paint repair I've ever seen was on a red 1990 Testarossa I had. I was polishing the car and getting the usual red residue on the polishing bonnet, except for the passenger's door. A close examination showed that the door had been repainted and clear coated...!?!?!? I can't imagine why a 2-stage paint repair was performed when the rest of the car has 1-stage red paint. But the amazing thing was that no matter what the lighting was, you absolutely could not tell the door was repainted - I could hardly believe it....it matched the rest of the car perfectly. That is the only time I've seen a paint repair that was invisible. Most times even VERY good resprays / repairs will be visible in certain lighting conditions......unfortunately. Sorry to ramble....
 

Nibby

Member
Messages
604
I've owned over 100 cars in my life, most of them high performance types, or unique and unusual, etc....and I'm VERY fussy about cosmetics. Sometimes paintwork is an unavoidable fact of life. When I needed it done, I would ask other people with high end cars or custom cars....who did their paint? It always boiled down to only 2 or 3 body shops that had the skills and knowledge to do high end paint repairs. I had a ZR-1 Corvette in medium blue metallic that needed the left-front hood repaired. I took it to a paint shop about an hours drive away, because I'd heard the painter was a true artist. He practiced painting several plastic panels and dried them in the sun, until he got he exact shade of blue and the metallic content just right. He then repaired the hood and blended into the doors, matching the factory orange peel texture and blue color. It looked awesome and I actually paid him a hefty tip because I was so happy with the results. In certain lighting conditions, I could tell what was done, but nobody else could unless I pointed it out to them. It was darn near perfect. But the best paint repair I've ever seen was on a red 1990 Testarossa I had. I was polishing the car and getting the usual red residue on the polishing bonnet, except for the passenger's door. A close examination showed that the door had been repainted and clear coated...!?!?!? I can't imagine why a 2-stage paint repair was performed when the rest of the car has 1-stage red paint. But the amazing thing was that no matter what the lighting was, you absolutely could not tell the door was repainted - I could hardly believe it....it matched the rest of the car perfectly. That is the only time I've seen a paint repair that was invisible. Most times even VERY good resprays / repairs will be visible in certain lighting conditions......unfortunately. Sorry to ramble....
Finding a good bodywork shop round my way has been a pain, using the paint code and even having a spectrophotometer put on one of my old cars produced bad results, as you say it's time consuming getting a good match.
I remember once having a red Triumph Stag that I thought I had a perfect match at the bottom of one of the doors until the first time I saw it under a street light and it looked even worse when it was on a ramp and I saw my handywork at eye level,not good.
 

ChrisQP09

Member
Messages
1,866
I just contacted a bodyshop ref to paint matching and apparently they use a camera? anyone heard of this method and is it remotely accurate?
 

Nibby

Member
Messages
604
I just contacted a bodyshop ref to paint matching and apparently they use a camera? anyone heard of this method and is it remotely accurate?
See my reference to a spectrophotometer in post 18, the mix can be tweaked if there're discrepancies in the colours, the trouble is it's time consuming. There's every chance your paint code on the car might be spot on and no need to use the spectro on it.
All I would say is be fussy from the outset and tell them in a diplomatic way it needs to be a very good match.