Not a happy car

masertel

Centenary Club
Messages
36
#21
A good fabricator should have no problem inserting the 200 cel cats but if they are fitted to your custom x pipe the rear O2 senors would struggle to stretch that far. The rear sensors just about reach the Larini but if push came to shove I suppose you could always extend the wiring.

Have attached a couple of pic showing the layout of Larini which may help. DSC01213.JPG DSC01272.JPG
 

D Walker

Centenary Club
Messages
6,422
#22
Is it not beyond the wit of man to weld/manufacture the necessary flanges to fit the UK / Euro Spec manifolds?
Which ever is required?
 

D Walker

Centenary Club
Messages
6,422
#24
Which then leads onto, can "we" not get our erstwhile x-pipe "gentleman" to produce pipes that take out the squish section.....
 

Zep

Moderator
Messages
1,457
#25
Yes, although I understand it is easier to build on the car - and I think Gentleman is a bit strong, even in "" ;)
 

D Walker

Centenary Club
Messages
6,422
#26
Yeah, I get that for the orientation of the flanges, couple to tack welds to set then remove to weld up, would probably only be worthwhile if did maybe 10 ar a time, the “ not so gentleman” could use the frankenmonster as a live jig perhaps.....
 
Messages
11,069
#28
I hope the replacement of the cat is the end of the issue.

You did mention the fear rge pops and bangs had caused the problems... is this a genuine risk in modded exhausts?
 

Zep

Moderator
Messages
1,457
#29
I hope the replacement of the cat is the end of the issue.

You did mention the fear rge pops and bangs had caused the problems... is this a genuine risk in modded exhausts?
If the substrate is ceramic (as it is on standard cats) then there is risk of mechanical damage, although the same can be said of the exhaust hitting things like speed bumps etc.
 

jasst

Junior Member
Messages
573
#30
So, finished putting it all back together, and unfortunately all is still not well. :too_sad::too_sad: Left it idling on the drive until operating temp was reached and all appeared well, no smoke, sounded ok,(well, as good as a fully de-cated, straight through system sounds), good oil pressure, left for an hour or so, started back up and taken up to temp again, and all ok as before, so decided to go for a short drive to test things out and oh f***, as soon as revs go above 3500, clouds of smoke and misfiring again, needless to say turned round and came home sharpish, amid lots of smoke, and lo and behold oil coming out of the air filter again :sad3::sad3::sad3: So to my mind there are still pressurisation issues, causing oil to be pushed out of the breather into the induction system hence the clouds of smoke and miss fire due to oil soaked maf, but what? Internet search suggests PCV valve could be the prob, but cant find any ref to one on this engine, any body got any ideas? beginning to lose heart at the moment :worried1::worried1:
 

conaero

Forum Owner
Messages
27,165
#32
Sounds like a blocked crank case breather....and do I know where that is...no.

Pressure builds up in the crank case and blows oil past the rings, into the head and fouls the plugs (misfire) and would ultimately escape from any available orifice...exhaust and inlet.
 

conaero

Forum Owner
Messages
27,165
#33
Hum, having a look on the ES website at engine schematics, what about the Oil accumulator, I remember issues with this in the past.

I have a spare one if you want to test. Ill keep digging...
 

conaero

Forum Owner
Messages
27,165
#37
And one more issue that results in crankcase pressure and usually blows the oil dipstick out:

Check the valve in the breather pipe that runs to the air filter. If this valve is faulty then to release crankcase pressure the only way is through the dip stick tube.

Regards
Rex B
 
Messages
68
#38
Hi Jasst,

I'm considering the possibilty that one on your turbochargers is pressurising the crankcase and possibly also forcing oil into the exhaust system.

The turbochargers run on bearings lubricated by engine oil at pressure, which is returned to the engine via a pipe which drains into the crankcase.

Excessive play in the bearings may cause the vanes to strike the casing, chipping off tiny fragments of metal, possibly giving the sparks that you are seeing.

At 3500 rpm, the turbos are spinning rapidly and may cause a noticeable problem at or above that engine speed.

If the turbochargers are leaking oil, you may find a significant quantity of it in the pipes which run from the turbochargers to the intercoolers, or from the intercoolers to the throttle body. When stationary, the oil will collect at the lowest point.

Regards

Duncan
 

jasst

Junior Member
Messages
573
#39
Hi Jasst,

I'm considering the possibilty that one on your turbochargers is pressurising the crankcase and possibly also forcing oil into the exhaust system.

The turbochargers run on bearings lubricated by engine oil at pressure, which is returned to the engine via a pipe which drains into the crankcase.

Excessive play in the bearings may cause the vanes to strike the casing, chipping off tiny fragments of metal, possibly giving the sparks that you are seeing.

At 3500 rpm, the turbos are spinning rapidly and may cause a noticeable problem at or above that engine speed.

If the turbochargers are leaking oil, you may find a significant quantity of it in the pipes which run from the turbochargers to the intercoolers, or from the intercoolers to the throttle body. When stationary, the oil will collect at the lowest point.

Regards

Duncan
This is a 4200, so no turbos