Maserati 222 4V 'recommissioning' thread

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
Time for my next question...

Does anybody have any useful info re: timing this engine properly? Specifically, with regards to making sure the intake cams are in time with respect to the exhaust cams. I'm confident the exhaust cams are correctly set, based on the fact their pulleys use woodruff keys so only really fit on the ends of the camshafts in one position.
However I'm not sure on the intakes. There are some marks on both intake cams - small paint dots on one side and some etched markings on the other - that line up with corresponding marks on one of the camshaft caps on each head. For now I have set the intake cams based on these marks, but I'd feel more comfortable knowing for sure that this was correct rather than trusting somebody else's work.

Can anyone chip in with some advice? I think I recall reading something about using 2 or 3 dial gauges on each cylinder head to set things up properly, but this procedure uses several factory tools that may be tricky (and expensive) to get hold of, so I'm wondering if there's some common knowledge out there.

Thanks in advance.
 

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
More progress on the Maser has occurred, however I don't have any decent-quality pictures. My phone's camera got all sorts of crud inside so any pictures I took were just a blurry mess. I've cleaned it out now so I can start taking pictures again.

Recent progress includes:
-Rear main oil seal replaced.
-Flywheel spigot bearing replaced.
-New clutch kit fitted, gearbox oil replaced, gearbox fitted back onto the engine.
-Starter motor refitted
-Valve clearance adjustment finished. What a job that was! Clearances are all improved now however. I had some shims custom made in Australia. The lengths I go to for my cars...
-Timing belt tensioner bracket sourced from David Askew. This is now fitted along with my new hydraulic tensioner.
-Crank pulley removed, old belt removed (very old I think - the manufacturer markings were almost invisible and the belt had significant signs of degradation). New belt installed, crank pulley refitted.
-A/C pump and P/S pump refitted to engine.
-New camshaft end seals fitted, and new seals fitted on front and rear cylinder head casings/covers.
-Removed and re-tightened a brake pipe I had replaced. Bled the front brakes - the fluid that came out was so old, it separated from the new stuff in the jar it was in...it was like cloudy apple juice. No brake leaks (touch wood).
-Started refitting a few pieces of interior trim. Probably not the best idea when I still have some welding to do, but I'm growing impatient now and really want to make some better progress.

I think that brings us neatly up to date. I'm currently waiting on a package from Maserati Spares which includes new AC, PS and alternator belts, 2 new casings for the cambelt idler bearings, and some new boots for the steering rack. I'm trying to set aside some spare cash for a water pump + gasket, a new thermostat and one or two other bits...once they've arrived, I can put the engine back in the car.

Exciting times ahead
 

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
Did I also mention that when i disassembled the thermostat housing, there was no thermostat inside?

I don't quite understand why somebody would omit one, this car must have taken a long time to warm up without one.
 

Wally

Junior Member
Messages
114
I have the data for valvetiming , but you still need the dials and skills to carry this out. These engines are very sensitive when it comes to incorrect timing.: lack of power is the result. Apart from that: your doing a great job!
 
Messages
1,434
I recall a Wheeler Dealer episode where Ed get's in an expert to tune the engine of a lambourgini Urraco rather than do it himself...
Eb
 

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
good heavens, what a journey.

I'd love to see this car, once complete...
Thanks, I'd love to see it completed too...

I have the data for valvetiming , but you still need the dials and skills to carry this out. These engines are very sensitive when it comes to incorrect timing.: lack of power is the result. Apart from that: your doing a great job!
I knew that would be the case, but I was quietly hoping somebody would provide some trick to make life much easier. Oh well, no problem - I'd rather know it was done properly, rather than 'chance it' by using somebody else's previous timing marks.

I've found one or two places where I can get hold of some of the tools, they ain't cheap though! But worth it to do the job properly. I think I'll need:
AG 25160 (Dial gauge holders)
AG 25180 (Dial gauge extensions)
AG 25140 (holder/extension for TDC dial guage)
2 more dial gauges, as I only have one at the moment.

Would you mind providing your information for the valve timing at TDC please? My engine manual is based on the Quattroporte IV V6 (AM 573 and 574) so some information is slightly different to what I know is correct for my AM477 engine. The valve timing data is probably the same, but it would be helpful to check.

I recall a Wheeler Dealer episode where Ed get's in an expert to tune the engine of a lambourgini Urraco rather than do it himself...
Eb
Yes, I remember that too, a good episode. I would say carb tuning is a bit more of an acquired skill than what I'm doing. Perhaps I'll learn that too one day.
 

spacecadet

Junior Member
Messages
229
Great progress

-New clutch kit fitted, gearbox oil replaced, gearbox fitted back onto the engine.
What gearbox do you have? ZF or 6 speed Getrag? Did the clutch set simply fit?

-Valve clearance adjustment finished. What a job that was! Clearances are all improved now however. I had some shims custom made in Australia. The lengths I go to for my cars...
Can you tell more about this? Was this cheaper then getting the shims from Maserati or why?
 

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
Great progress



What gearbox do you have? ZF or 6 speed Getrag? Did the clutch set simply fit?



Can you tell more about this? Was this cheaper then getting the shims from Maserati or why?
Thanks. My gearbox is a 5 speed Getrag unit, the clutch kit fitted into place without any issues (as far as I know!)

As for the shims, I felt like they were good value and I could order exactly what I needed online, it was quick and easy. I also measured them all with my digital micrometer before fitting them, they were all fine. The service was good, I would definitely use them again.

Is the engine still out of the car, Haydn..?
It is indeed!
 

Bertone

New Member
Messages
10
Hi Haydn,

Great write-up!!

I found this fantastic web page: http://www.maserati-alfieri.co.uk/alfieri00a.htm
Scroll down to "BITURBOS" on the left-hand side, and there you have several links to the Biturbo worshop manuals...

Hope they come in handy!

I'm thinking on buying a 224v that I've seen here in Madrid (Spain) so I might ask you and the rest of members here for some buying advice in a new post that I will create soon:happy:
 

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
Thanks Bertone - that's a very useful link, I've visited that website many times.

It's time for an update.

I sold my troublesome 164 Q4 back in November as I was fed up with it. The car sold on eBay, only just meeting the reserve which was disappointing but hey ho, never mind. It's now back in Holland where it was first registered. I can't say I was too disappointed to see the back of it really. In stark contrast, I hated seeing my old 1991 164 Cloverleaf being driven away.

In early December I bought my newest car to date - a 1999 Alfa GTV 3.0 24V. Silver with tan leather. I've always liked 916 GTVs but didn't think I'd be able to afford a 3.0 with my budget, yet I won the bidding on the below car on eBay. It needed a full service which I completed in early January, replacing a few other items and painting a few parts along the way. It's now running very nicely (touch wood) and it sounds lovely, if a little quiet.

Pic 1.jpg
DSC_1583.jpg

With the GTV sorted, I could once again turn my attention to the 222 4v.
I finished setting the timing on the engine and thus decided it was time to drop it back into the car. I refitted the gear lever assembly back onto the back of the gearbox just to see how far it would be sticking out (and therefore how much of a problem it would be) when lowering the engine back into the car. Of course, while tightening the nut and bolt that holds the assembly in place, I accidentally used a bit too much muscle... As soon as I saw the aluminium casting flex a little, I knew I had made a big mistake. Within a split second a chunk cracked off. The below picture should sum things up... d'oh.

DSC_1598.jpg

I decided to have a go at fixing it myself. I bought a spool of aluminium welding wire from a local tools place, practiced a bit on an old casting I had lying round, and then tested my newfound skills on the broken gearbox casting. I don't have a picture of the finished product as it's a bit untidy, not helped by the fact that the welder kept jamming due to evidence of dirt/corrosion inside the nozzle, but it appears strong enough so I'm happy. I even made a metal bracket to sit over the top of it, with holes drilled into each side for the bolt to pass through. Fingers crossed it should be fine.

Onwards with the engine installation... at which point the engine hoist lost the majority of its lifting ability, so we had to spend some time bleeding it which eventually got it working again. So, in went the engine at last. It must have been out of the car for around 14 months, if not longer.

DSC_1610.jpg

The reassembly continued...

DSC_1618.jpg

...until the engine was eventually complete once more.

DSC_1626.jpg

However, the **** thing just wouldn't fire up. It would turn over fine but the most we could get out of it was the odd splutter. Eventually, the starter motor - a refurbished unit I should add, being used for the first time - stopped working. I reluctantly started removing the necessary parts to gain access to it. While doing this, I had a quick look down one of the inlet ports, which is when I saw this:

DSC_1629.jpg

I know the picture isn't great, but it shows evidence of rusty water inside the combustion chamber. The head gaskets needed to be replaced. At least four of the cylinders showed traces of this. Naturally I wasn't best pleased when I saw this, but I decided to keep the momentum going and not let these mishaps slow me down. So, the next day I got both heads off (with a little assistance). I was told this could only be done with the engine removed the car, but the only other components I had to slacken/remove were the brake master cylinder and the exhaust manifolds (along with the three bolts between the manifold assembly on each side of the engine and the Y pipe for additional space to pull the manifolds away from the engine). Out they came, again showing signs of water ingress into some of the cylinders.

DSC_1630.jpg

Thankfully there was no corrosion to be seen anywhere, which I rather surprised at if I'm honest. So I cleaned up the heads a bit, as well as the mating surfaces on the engine block. Thankfully I already had a new pair of head gaskets which I had bought as part of a kit, so they went straight on, and within a day or so I was once again putting the top of the engine back together ready to try to start the car for the first time.

DSC_1645.jpg

I also fitted another new starter motor. Here is a picture of the inside of the 'old' one; it had basically melted a bit and seized solid, as far as we could tell.

DSC_1647.jpg

Finally, the engine was back together yet again. It still wouldn't start though. I was going through everything I could think of, including cleaning earths and connections, swapping out the relays for the ignition and injection management, and so on. I replaced the fuel filter as a precaution (it should have two though...) and poured in some more fresh fuel. It had fuel at the rail, and the plugs were sparking but not as strong as they should have been. The following morning I started my investigations in earnest, desperate to get it running, and I noticed the leads between the distributor cap and coils A and B were plugged in the wrong way round. I swapped them over and as if by magic...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGet7_OocyE&lc=z22rut3jey3cxhbok04t1aokgrep0xwjd4u3it0yskg5rk0h00410

The video doesn't quite show how loud the car is; it's very noisy, in fact it might be an issue when it goes for an MOT. I love the noise though, it's so deep and burbly, just as these cars should be in my opinion. :D

So, what work remains? Here's a brief list of the things I'm aware of:
-Steering rack is leaking - needs to be removed and rebuilt
-Steering pump is noisy - I have a new one on the way
-Need to spend time testing various connections and sensors as the Check Engine light is illuminated
-Brake fluid refill and re-bleed all four corners after removing and refitting the brake master cylinder
-Plug in the reverse light switch on the side of the gearbox (this will be fiddly)
-Bleed the clutch and see if the car will drive (there's no reason why it shouldn't though)
-Finish fixing the rust in the O/S floor, then fix the rest of it... both sills, N/S floor, some patches in the front wheel arches...
-Finish messing around with the interior. I've reversed my decision to re dye all the leather as I just couldn't achieve a finish I was totally happy with, so I'll need to remove the dye from the parts I've recoloured so far. I can then reinstall it all.
-Testing of all electrical controls (mainly lights and whatnot for the MOT) and fixing any remaining issues, such as leaks and such.

I'll get there soon enough. If I maintain the current momentum I'm 90% certain the car will be ready in time for summer.
 

HaydnW

Junior Member
Messages
112
Apologies for the quality of the pictures too. My phone's camera lens is beyond saving, but I should have a new phone in a month or two.
 

2b1ask1

Moderator
Messages
13,372
Great work Haydn; such a satisfying feeling when they run after major works isn't it?

What is with the temperature gauge reading -35?
 

agooner

Junior Member
Messages
101
Well done, I am envious of your determination and perseverance. Anything I try is bound to go wrong (plumbing, Kitchen worktop, etc) so tend to avoid it now.